Saturday, October 27, 2012

Arts businesses: finding success in a tough financial climate (via Guardian Professional)

"Every business is typically affected by an economic downturn and the one we find ourselves in now is no different. In some cases, the arts and culture sector has been hit hardest, which is especially true where public art is concerned, as investment and spend in this area has dried up considerably.

But looking inwardly and trying not to just blame the economic market can help to minimise the impact. If you have confidence in your product or service, believe you're a leading player in your market and have the talent within your team to innovate, you can prosper, not just survive."

Make a good plan, invest well in a strong team and don't be afraid to broaden your market, says Darren Henderson: Arts businesses: finding success in a tough financial climate - Guardian Professional.

Friday, October 12, 2012

The Myth of Work-Life Balance - A Debate on Career and Motherhood (The Atlantic and Artinfo)


Jennifer Dalton, "How Do Artists Live?" (2006)
Jennifer Dalton, "How Do Artists Live?" (2006)
Have women been buying into a myth for the past 40 years? Or has the next generation simply lost touch with the ideals of feminism? How would gender equality look in a perfect world? The Atlantic asked writers from a range of professional backgrounds and family situations to comment on The Myth of Work-Life Balance - A Debate on Career and Motherhood by Anne-Marie Slaughter. She describes her own experience of stepping down from a high-level State Department position to teach at Princeton and spend more time with her children. In the process, she came to an uncomfortable realization: No matter what well-meaning feminists might say, women really can't have it all. "Not today," she writes, "not with the way America's economy and society are currently structured."

Inspired by the debate around Anne-Marie Slaughter's Atlantic article "Why Women Still Can't Have It All," ARTINFO reached out to women in the art world for their thoughts of balancing career and family, from successful gallerists to international artists. Specifically, they asked three questions:

1. Slaughter claims that society's competitive work conditions make it difficult, and arguably impossible, to "have it all," with regards to a healthy life balance of family and work. Does this kind of sentiment resonate with your experience?

2. Do you think there are specific issues facing women in the art world? Is it a field in which it is easier or more difficult for women to have families and high-profile careers?

3. If there were anything you would change about the field so that women could more easily balance the choice of having both a family and a career, what would it be?

Read further on: The "Having It All" Debate: RoseLee Goldberg, Lisa Phillips, and Others on Career and Family in the Art World - Artinfo.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Ideas are easy, implementation is hard: Making Ideas Happen with Scott Belsky

"Creativity is a commendable quality. Good ideas are very valuable, and a person with repeated sparks of genius is priceless. But, even the most creative ideas amount to nothing if they’re not organized, established and executed. That’s where Scott Belsky, author of Making Ideas Happen can empower you with the follow-through needed to bring your intangible ideas into reality. Belsky believes that “creative professionals — defined as those who generate (and sometimes execute) ideas for a living — constitute what is likely the most disorganized community on the planet.”

Read further: Making Ideas Happen with Scott Belsky: Book Review and Interview - workawesome.com.

Or go directly to: Making ideas happen by Scott Belsky - 99U and download your free excerpt of the book: "Many of us believe that great ideas inevitably lead to success. Nothing could be further from the truth. Whether it is the perfect solution for an everyday problem or a bold new concept for a creative masterpiece, you must transform vision into reality for an idea to have value."

Monday, July 16, 2012

wideopenschool.com: 100 International Artists Reinvent School

Made during
Jeremy Deller's & Ed Hall’s
Banner Making Workshop
The Hayward Gallery’s Wide Open School is an unusual experiment in learning. Its programme of classes is devised and delivered by over 100 artists from approximately 40 different countries. It is not an art school however. Instead it is a wide-ranging forum where artists – including Jeremy Deller, Yael Bartana, Marlene Dumas, Tracey Emin, Antony Gormley, Bob and Roberta Smith, Jalal Toufic and Thomas Hirschhorn – lead and facilitate workshops, collaborative projects, collective discussions, lectures and performances about any and all subjects in which they are passionately interested. Subjects will take in cloud architecture, Freddie Mercury, deep space, and sex in the colonies.

 Visit: wideopenschool.com. The project ran from Juny 11 till July 11, 2012.

Sunday, July 15, 2012

We are lucky!

Recently a friend of mine pointed out this remarkable & inspirational project/website to me: An anonymous British millionaire has decided to give away £1,000 (or equivalent) to strangers. He’s dedicated the last years to spreading and sharing his new found wealth through random encounters across the globe. Recipients of the £1,000 are asked to put the money towards something good, and to share their stories on his site. There’s no application process or forms to fill in.

How the act of giving creates giving and good will (and responsibility). Like Edward (one of the lucky few) is stating: "I was really happy, but also suddenly very aware that I couldn't spend the money on myself. It just didn't feel like it would be the right thing to do." It's definitely worth to read the profiles and stories of people who have gotten money.

Wearelucky.: "There is no formal selection process and encounters are governed by luck. Recipients are offered £1,000 (or equivalent). The only criteria is that the money must be spent on something good. The interpretation of that remains open."

Monday, June 18, 2012

Fantasy art school: artists reveal their dream teachers (guardian.co.uk)

This month, more than 100 artists from 40 countries are heading to London's Southbank to host workshops as part of the Hayward's alternative college of art, Wide Open School. Subjects in the timetable range from dining and singing sessions and sushi-making performance art classes to the Sundown Schoolhouse of Queer Home Economics, plus explorations of time and space, forensics and Freddie Mercury. As the college swings open its doors, we ask a selection of artists who their dream teachers would be. With Bob and Roberta Smith, Marlene Dumas, Tracey Emin, Thomas Hirschhorn a.o.

Take a look at: Fantasy art school: artists reveal their dream teachers - guardian.co.uk.

And please check out: Wide Open School. An unusual experiment in learning!  Its programme of classes is devised and delivered by over 100 artists from approximately 40 different countries. It is not an art school however. Instead it is a wide-ranging forum where artists lead and facilitate workshops, collaborative projects, collective discussions, lectures and performances about any and all subjects in which they are passionately interested.

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

The Public School: a framework that supports autodidactic activities

THE PUBLIC SCHOOL is a school with no curriculum. At the moment, it operates as follows: first, classes are proposed by the public (I want to learn this or I want to teach this); then, people have the opportunity to sign up for the classes (I also want to learn that); finally, when enough people have expressed interest, the school finds a teacher and offers the class to those who signed up.

THE PUBLIC SCHOOL is not accredited, it does not give out degrees, and it has no affiliation with the public school system. It is a framework that supports autodidactic activities, operating under the assumption that everything is in everything.

Read further at: The Public School.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Top artists reveal how to find creative inspiration (from The Guardian)

Top artists reveal how to find creative inspiration: Guy Garvey, Isaac Julien, Martha Wainwright and other artists give their top tips for unleashing your inner genius.

15 examples to get you started:

  • Don't be scared of failure. Mistakes can be inspiring.
  • There is much to learn from other artists.
  • If you get overexcited by an idea, take a break and come back to it later.
  • Don't forget to have a life.
  • Try to reshape your ideas in other forms.
  • Always be on the lookout. Stay open.
  • It's useful to get perspective on what you do by talking to all sorts of different people.
  • Break any rule if you know deep inside that it is important.
  • Ask questions you can't answer easily.
  • Once there's an idea, turn it upside down and take it seriously for a moment – even if it seems silly.
  • Daydream. Give yourself plenty of time to do nothing.
  • Collaborate. Go on a journey with someone who is as different to you as chalk and cheese.
  • Don't wait for a good idea to come to you. Start by realising an average idea.
  • Hang on in there. Inspiration can come at any time.
  • Take a deep breath, and a leap of faith.

Read everything here: Top artists reveal how to find creative inspiration - The Guardian.

Friday, October 28, 2011

How Do We Prepare Kids for Jobs We Can't Imagine Yet? Teach Imagination. (GOOD)

"When you were a kid, could you, your teachers, or your parents imagine your current job? Plenty of us go to work every day in careers that didn't exist when we were in grade school. How can schools set the next generation up for success when we don't have a clear picture of what the jobs of the future will be? The growing consensus is that we need to shift schools toward fostering creativity and conceptual thinking abilities, and a new project called Imagination: Creating the Future of Education and Work wants to help educators figure out how to do it.

The project started in 2007 at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and the two co-directors, Rita J. King and Joshua Fouts, say we're presently in an "Imagination Age," "a time during which humanity must imagine and then create, together, the systems of the new global economy and culture." The duo actually created a lab to test ways educators can most effectively build imagination and creativity in real teaching situations.

Instead of simply putting their research on how to foster imagination, creativity, and conceptual thinking into a report, King and Fouts decided to create a free, easy-to-use web portal that's full of the ideas and solutions that they've found work best."

Read the whole post on GOOD: How Do We Prepare Kids for Jobs We Can't Imagine Yet? Teach Imagination.

Or go directly to Imagination: Creating the Future of Education and Work.

Monday, October 10, 2011

7 Types of Creative Block (and What to Do About Them) - via The 99 Percent

"For a creative professional, a creative block isn't just frustrating -- it's potentially career-damaging. When you rely on your creativity to pay the bills and build your reputation, you can't afford to be short of ideas or the energy to put them into action. But all creative blocks are not created equal. Different types of block require different solutions -- something that's easily forgotten when you're feeling stuck.

Here are seven of the most common types, and how to unblock them: 7 Types of Creative Block (and What to Do About Them) - The 99 Percent.